Acknowledgement of Country

The Australian National Maritime Museum acknowledges the Gadigal people of the Eora nation as the Traditional Custodians of the bamal (earth) and badu (waters) on which we work.

We also acknowledge all traditional custodians of the land and waters throughout Australia and pay our respects to them and their cultures, and to Elders past, present and emerging.

Throughout 2020 the museum will host several exhibitions which bring to life differing perspectives from those onboard the ship and those on the shore.

Art and objects from the 18th-century, through to contemporary Indigenous work, will elicit discussion and encourage all Australians to rethink our history.

Main image: View of the East Coast Encounter - Reimagining 1770 exhibition at the Australian National Maritime Museum, 2014. 

Defying Empire

Tony Albert - The Hand You’re Dealt, 2016. Courtesy of the artist and Sullivan + Strumpf, Photo: Sam Noonan. Purchased 2017 in recognition of the 50th Anniversary of the 1967 Referendum.

Image: Tony Albert - The Hand You’re Dealt, 2016. Courtesy of the artist and Sullivan + Strumpf, Photo: Sam Noonan. Purchased 2017 in recognition of the 50th Anniversary of the 1967 Referendum.

Defying Empire: third National Indigenous Art Triennial  from the National Gallery of Australia commemorates the 50th anniversary of the 1967 Referendum that recognised Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as Australians for the first time. It explores the ongoing resilience of Australia’s Indigenous people since first contact, through to the historical fight for recognition and ongoing activism in the present day. 

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Under Southern Skies

Image: 1742 French chart of the Pacific Ocean by Jacques Nicolas Bellin reflects the limited European knowledge of the Pacific in the first half of the 18th century
Image: 1742 French chart of the Pacific Ocean by Jacques Nicolas Bellin reflects the limited European knowledge of the Pacific in the first half of the 18th century

From the observation of the transit of Venus, to the importance of the night sky in Torres Strait Islander navigation and voyaging – planets and stars unite the long history of all navigators around Australia. In 2020 the Navigators gallery will be redeveloped to include new acquisitions and collection objects from Indigenous Australian and Pacific navigation, as well as a selection of important new material associated with James Cook and other European navigators. A highlight will be the temporary display of the so-called ‘secret orders’ issued to Cook outlining the mission for HMB Endeavour after observing the transit of Venus in 1769. Stay tuned for more details closer to the exhibition's launch.

 

Paradise Lost: Daniel Solander’s Legacy

Michel Tuffery Tupaia and Solander Pōtaka Tā at Opoutama, 27 October 1769 hand-coloured woodcut Dimensions (mm): 500(h) x 350(w) From an edition of 15/2019
Image: Michel Tuffery, Tupaia and Solander Pōtaka Tā at Opoutama, 27 October 1769, hand-coloured woodcut, Dimensions (mm): 500(h) x 350(w), From an edition of 15/2019

This exhibition commemorates the legacy of the Endeavour botanist Daniel Solander and the first encounter between Sweden and the Pacific Region. It features fine art prints by ten leading contemporary New Zealand artists selected to bring a unique vision to this historical event and Solander’s legacy. It will also feature Australian Indigenous scientific knowledges as a framework to explore engravings of botanical specimens collected in Australia by Joseph Banks and Daniel Solander from the national maritime collection.

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